We asked Michelle to react to three quotes made by industry heroes.

“No matter where I am working, I cannot make a film without 100% creative control and final cut. If there is such a guarantee, I can work anywhere.”

– Bong Joon-ho

Not for me! I actually enjoy working with strict frameworks & tight deadlines. That is what makes our job so varied. From a hardstyle festival in the weekend, to a fashion show for a well know tv station during the week and a fancy wedding or trip to the museum or theatre on a Friday night. All these different projects with different outputs, themes and target groups each week keeps us sharp.

Of course, every now and then you need to be able to fully express yourself creatively. An idea you have been sitting on for a while and for which your fingers are itching. We often find the freedom to express these in projects for artist such as video clips or new visual content.

“I don’t have enough time and I feel like I am really having to step up and go to the movies more and not fall prey to all these TV series.”

– Chloë Sevigny

For me there is little difference between a film or a series. There is simply always too little time :). As an entrepreneur and a creative, there is the constant battle to find the right balance between running a business with employees and everything involved, and finding enough time to develop myself as a creative/animator/vj. If I don’t find sufficient time for my creative development, I get cranky and unhappy. But at the same time I am able to value free time very much these days. I used to work every second and frequently pull all-nighters, today I can appreciate sleep and social evenings and safeguard these without feeling guilty.

“I’ve actually been trying to figure out how to create more and more distance between myself and the projects; so that it creates conversation.”

– JR

Usually there is already a certain distance, considering the topic of our work, and therefore the conversation about it, is predetermined by the client. However during our live performances we can play with the interaction between the music and the audience. It is interesting to see the difference in interacting when vj-ing for a for example Asian audience or for down-to-earth Dutchmen at a dance festival. Visual language might seem universal, but is received and interpreted differently at different places in the world.

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